LOVER and Friends: Bharat Floorings' DashDashDot

Q&A with Tania Singh Khosla and Sandeep Khosla

Three years ago Bharat Floorings, the company that dresses up historic establishments and homes with its iconic tiles found themselves with a unique problem. They regularly collaborated with various architects and interior designers on bespoke tile collections, but had a pile of stencils on their factory floor they could never use again.

Thus they launched BFT+ to commission contemporary artists and designers from various fields to create tile designs that would end up within their vast catalogue. Problem solver and vice chairman Firdaus Variava, who is leading them in the new direction calls it heritage of the future.

For their latest collection DashDashDot, they collaborated with graphic designer Tania Singh Khosla and architect Sandeep Khosla. We caught up with the couple and long time collaborators to learn more about it.

What is DashDashDot?

DashDashDot is a collection of tiles constructed from lines or dashes and circles or dots inspired by simple geometry.

The collection comprises a kit of parts – 4 basic tile units that can be composed in infinite ways to create a huge variety of textures and patterns. Each tile unit can be used individually as a repeat pattern, or in any combination with one or more of the other tiles. This allows the user to really have fun customising their floor or wall surface. The beauty of this collection lies in its immense versatility. In terms of colour, as of now we have four colour palettes: Black on White, White on Dark Grey, Dusky Rose with Grey and Chocolate and Black with Blue Lagoon, Terracotta Red and Sunshine Yellow.


Have you both collaborated together on projects before?

Sandeep and I have often collaborated on projects where he’s needed graphic intervention to enhance a space or if I’ve worked on the branding of a space he has designed. Sometimes the boundaries between interior and graphic design have blurred, leading to exciting, often unexpected outcomes.

The first such project we collaborated was the MTV office in Bangalore 20 years ago. More recently we’ve worked on Tower Kitchen, a fine dining restaurant where a contemporary mid-century inspired space is juxtaposed with a stunning screen, in which we transformed utilitarian kitchen utensils into an art installation.


How did the project with BFT come about?

We have for a while been toying with the idea of creating our own range of lifestyle products – furniture, accessories, etc, bringing both our strengths and sensibilities together.

The idea of designing tiles for Bharat Floorings came about over a conversation with Firdaus who was already pushing the boundaries and innovating with other designers. This seemed like an exciting and natural extension of our idea to collaborate on products. Sandeep has been using terrazzo tiles for several projects and has even designed a range of his own for the Library House. We both love the natural materiality of this traditional, handmade technique. Sandeep has a great understanding of what would look beautiful and be versatile in an interior space and I’m good with patterns, colour and surface graphics. The pieces all fit together.


What was the process of designing the collection?

The process started out very organically, discussing ideas, sharing image references. We created initial sketches together and researched what else is out there. Once we hit upon two basic principles: One that we wanted to work with simple paired down geometry of lines and dots and really see how far we could push this idea. And two, that we wanted to create a versatile collection that could be composed in many different ways, then the roles got divided.


What were each of your roles in designing the collection?

I along with my team worked on various designs, from simple to complex. Sandeep would get involved in helping visualise how the compositions worked over a large surface, adding and subtracting elements to create balance. Sandeep has a really astute sense of what will work in a space, how a tile design can adapt from a floor to a wall space, as well as what will appeal to a certain kind of end user. My strength is in creating exciting visual patterns, and playing with form. I’m very sensitised to colour, putting nuanced combinations together and his is to make sure that the colours work in an interior space.

There was a fair amount of back and forth where we had to alter our design a little to work with what was possible in the mould such as altering the line thickness of the pattern. But having said that, we are thrilled with the outcome. Also, as a graphic designer, when you work in print, you are seeking absolute perfection. Here, the beauty likes in the imperfections and the wabi-sabi which is a natural outcome of the making process. This is the most beautiful aspect of the tiles which we love.


What was the most important thing to achieve from the finished collection?

We wanted to create a collection that was distinct, and had a sense of whimsy and playfulness. A versatile design that could work in a verandah or a statement powder room, or with nostalgic colonial furniture or timeless mid-century design. The simplicity of elements that make up each tile, the carefully created colour palettes from 2 to 4 colours in each collection allows for all of this. The real challenge however, was to create a collection that would look balanced and interesting no matter what combination of tiles you chose to use.
 

 

 

Tania Singh Khosla has a Masters of Fine Art in Graphic Design from Yale University and runs a branding and graphic design firm, tsk Design. Follow them on instagram at @tskdesignindia.

Sandeep Khosla studied architecture at Pratt Institute, New York and is the founder and principal of architecture and interior design firm, Khosla Associates.

Photography by Shamanth Patil


We're excited to introduce Bharat Floorings as a Friend of LOVER.

Earlier this year, we launched Friends - our community partnerships program. If you’d like to know more or become one, write to us at hello@loverand.co

We like Lady Pow

We're all about the tenets of sustainable fashion and we maintain there's not much better than reuse. Bandra's preloved clothing popups are always on our radar and this one is inspired by our favourite neighbourhood mainstay: the Bandra aunty

Stylist, fashion consultant and thrifter Nikhil D ran into Betty Clifford during a shoot upstairs at her home, the iconic Peace Haven bungalow. But this true-blue (no pun intended) Bandra aunty is a self-confessed ex-hoarder learning to let go. A week later, he handpicked 45 pieces from her wardrobe, many of them impulsive buys she'd barely worn.

Aunty Betty's fashion finds from all over the world are now available for purchase (some nipped, tucked and updated, some sold as is) in an exhibition curated by Nikhil and styled into full fictional aunty-outfits (skirt suits, pussy-bow blouses and dainty frocks!). It also has several of our favourite designers thrown into the mix, including Bodice, ekà, Shift, péro, plus vintage from Lovebirds and Viange. Aunty Betty's share of the profits go to St Andrew's Church Charity so we recommend you go for the clothes and the cause, and you stay for the port wine and cutlet pao. We're all about the Bandra aunty, after all. 

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Lady Pow pops up at Lifaafa, Bandra between 15th and 22nd December. Get more details here.

Follow Nikhil D on instagram at @nikhildx.

We like Kadak Collective

Earlier this year in June, eight South Asian women artists and writers who live and work all over India and the world came together to showcase their work for the very first time at ELCAF, the East London Comic Arts Festival. They called themselves the Kadak collective. This weekend they bring their travelling library to Bandra’s Cuckoo Club so we grilled them with a few questions.

 

Who makes up the Kadak collective and how did you all end up coming together?

We are

 Akhila Krishnan (filmmaker, writer + illustrator)

Aindri Chakraborty (illustrator + comic artist)

Janine Shroff (illustrator + artist)

Mira Malhotra (designer, illustrator + writer)

Garima Gupta (illustrator + comic artist)

Pavithra Dikshit (designer, typographer + artist)

Kaveri Gopalakrishnan (illustrator + comic artist)

Aarthi Parthasarathy (filmmaker + writer)

Aindri got us all together as she was interested in representing a minority voice at ELCAF. We had all been following each others’ work online and have a myriad connections.

 

How did the name Kadak come about?

It was inspired by a matchbox, namely this one. People in the collective liked the name because it was hard-hitting but still felt playful. Also Kadak chai! Kadak means strong, severe, sharp – like our tea. We have strong opinions, even if they do clash, and the name represents that. 

 

There's a certain level of both inquiry and commentary in your works. What are some themes that feature often? What are some concerns you share?  

THEMES: Women and domestic work - gardening, cooking, etc. Politics, personal musings, urban lore, people in urban spaces, birdwatching and nature, gender binary and non-conformity, humour, Indian history and mythology, typography, folk art, women’s issues, menstruation, pop culture, fashion etc.  

CONCERNS WE SHARE: Our Whatsapp group is a pretty colourful place for debate on pop culture.
We discuss sexual violence, Azealia Banks’ latest twitter breakdown and the articles we read.

 

Akhila Krishnan's Alone but not Lonely explores gender and choice — specifically, the pressure women are put under to get married and have children — and those that choose not to do so.

Akhila Krishnan's Alone but not Lonely explores gender and choice — specifically, the pressure women are put under to get married and have children — and those that choose not to do so.

Would you call yourselves a feminist collective?

Since we have less representation as women in this space, being a woman artist producing work on any topic is itself a feminist act. Did we seek out like feminists when forming the group? No. So perhaps the work isn’t always to do with the feminist movement as such, some of us do produce work like that: Aindri’s My Green Period (published in Issue Three), Kaveri’s My Secret Crop, Aarthi’s Royal Existentials, Janine’s Rape Rick and Mira’s Unfolding the Saree are examples of feminist works of varying degrees.

Pavithra’s Discipline, Garima’s Birds of Paradise and Hubbub, Akhila’s 100 days of Travelers in Red are work produced from the vantage point of women, but do not necessarily have feminism associated with it in a big way.

 

Kaveri Gopalakrishnan's Misfits is a series of standalone short comics offering a humorous insight into the societal expectations that are placed on women’s bodies and appearances.

Kaveri Gopalakrishnan's Misfits is a series of standalone short comics offering a humorous insight into the societal expectations that are placed on women’s bodies and appearances.

Some of you were physicaly present at ELCAF. What was your experience like?

It was strange, and also exciting, to be selling our own personal products at an international stall. Our stall was the brightest flaming one out there: firstly we had 8 people’s individual work out there on the table, very diverse in itself. And then Akhila’s personal collection of Indian objects and Aindris chaicups that we drew on (and which someone wanted to buy) decorating it like our own little house.I felt like we were very brown and that this was very brown work: it was an incredible and odd feeling to look at yourself through others’ eyes! The response was really rewarding: a lot of folks hadn’t seen something like this before, I think.

Our favourite ELCAF memories are of Akhila pulling out mira’s Saree zine with a flourish (to each customer!) like a sarishop seller in a local boutique and hard-selling it like a pro, Aindri breaking into massive grins over Ramayan Gurlz and stress-grinning when buyers came, and buying supermarket bags of candy with Janine which we then stuffed into our mouths very unprofessionally sitting behind the stall (We didn’t really get much time to breathe!). Someone walked up to Kaveri and asked her if we were selling the Ramayana. We cannot forget her facepalm and eye roll.

 

What has happened since ELCAF?

We worked on the Gender Bender exhibition supported by Goethe Institute in Bangalore this September. Our online showcase ‘The Reading Room’ featured eight new pieces and our ELCAF graphic shorts, artworks, mini-comic zines, and visual essays — exploring different aspects of gender and gender identity across India, post-Brexit UK and the Philippines.

 

Aarthi Parthasarthy and Mira Malhotra's Personal (Cyber) Space is an animated comic about sexism and social media. 

Aarthi Parthasarthy and Mira Malhotra's Personal (Cyber) Space is an animated comic about sexism and social media. 

What can we expect this weekend?

We are bringing our traveling library of self-published comics, zines and art to Cuckoo Club in Mumbai. The Reading Room opens with the talk/presentation 'A History of Women in Comics', which culls together research about the history of female comic creators and representation of women in comics in India and the western world, from the beginnings of the medium in the late 1800s till present day. It traverses the journey of various women in the field - their struggles and achievements, lesser-known comics over the years and the follows the changes in production and distribution with the movement from print to web.

This will be followed by an introduction to the Kadak collective, their work and a Q and A with some of the members.

 

 

Click the event posters above for more details and follow them on instagram at @kadakcollective

 

An interview with Cereal editor Rosa Park

 

Darling of the indie publishing world (and instagram), Cereal magazine is famous for their striking design aesthetic, paired back photography and all round discerning taste in travel and style.

Their newest release Volume 12 features our very own Rajasthan (with a side of Agra) and to celebrate, Paper Planes - LOVER's dearest friends and exclusive distributors for Cereal in India - are hosting a launch event featuring photography from the issue as well as pieces from some of Rajasthan’s best contemporary design labels at Ministry of New this Thursday. 

We interviewed editor Rosalia Park to talk two of our favourite topics: independent publishing and travel, and get the dope on the newest issue of Cereal ahead of their India launch.

 

How would you describe Cereal to a new reader?

In very simple terms, I would say a magazine published in the UK about travel and style.

We release 2 issues a year so we’re biannual and it’s a very aesthetically oriented title as lot of emphasis to the visual side of things however the copy itself is also very considered which is why we released a literary supplement called Weekend which is just text only. By doing that we felt like we were giving it the right balance.


What does Cereal cover?

So obviously travel and style are pretty broad terms, quite all encompassing.

Within our travel section we will do your typical travel stories like covering certain sights and destinations and we’ll also interview locals to that area that we really admire, often times architects or designers. And within the style section we cover anything from fashion and interiors to art and design.

It’s quite a wide-ranging title in what we cover but I think it all comes together through the aesthetic sensibility that we always focus on.


Now nearing your fourth anniversary, since you launched what changes have you made to both Cereal itself and the way you do business? Were you always biannual?

We have shifted focus ever so slightly. I like to say that every issue of Cereal is an iteration of itself. We’re still true to the cereal brand but we keep making small tweaks trying to improve it, that’s always the goal.

Initially we were a food and travel title, 50% food and 50% travel. We changed to travel and lifestyle because we realised we could talk about food through the travel lens which is what we preferred anyway. The third iteration was travel and style, that was largely to do with the connotations that come with the word lifestyle in today’s dialogue, I think there is a lot of baggage tied to the word lifestyle these days. So we kind of wanted to break from that and have something much more neutral.

That’s why we went with travel and style. That’s probably where we’re gonna end up for while.


Were you always biannual?

We were quarterly and then we changed to biannual two years ago. We made that decision because we felt that the pace of a biannual title suited us better. Because then you have roughly six months to create each issue and for a small team you really do need that extra time when you’re trying to make the best product possible.

When you’re on a three month calendar, really you only have a month to create the actual content because you’re a month in production, a month in research, and that was way too rushed for us in the end.

That’s why we made that call. I have no doubts that it was the right decision because now we have bigger, better, longer issue of Cereal twice a year.


What about the business itself?

I think all the changes that have happened to the business in the last four years have been fairly organic kind of the growth pattern that most businesses would follow.

Obviously we steadily increased our circulation and reach in terms of how many countries we’re stocked in and how many stores. Then we diversified by offering printed city guide books which Is this book series that we now do. We have London, New York, Paris and Copenhagen with more cities to launch next year. Then we moved on to creating content in partnerships with brands. So there’s a whole other part of the business which is Cereal Partnerships.

We do operate as an unofficial agency. So we offer our creative services to specific brands when they come to us looking for a Cereal style in their product.

All these things happened over time very naturally out of interest from third parties.That’s kind of how we’ve evolved to where we are now, which I would say it’s pretty on point for most media companies.


Who would you say is the Cereal reader?

I always like to think that it’s our peers. Obviously when you create something you have audience in mind and for me it’s always myself and my friends.

Anywhere from 25 to 45 years old is our target age group, kind of very well travelled, design conscious, discerning, younger travellers like myself and Rich. That’s how I envision our readership.


What are your tips for staying in business as an independent publisher?

I don’t think there is a magic answer, you work hard and you hope that your product sells and that you’re bringing in enough money to keep going.

You can’t have creativity without money, and that’s the very honest truth. Because you can have really great ideas that will never see the light of day because you don’t have the money to bring it to life.

I’m sure that’s something lots of independent publishers struggle with. Even purely for content, you want to take the best photos in the best locations with the best stylists and photographers and it costs a fortune so it’s constantly creating a balance and compromise between creative urges and financial realities.

I don’t know what the right balance is, for every publisher it’s different but you just have to find what you’re comfortable with, and keep trying to push yourself so you are creating better content but you’re not irresponsibly spending budgets that you don’t have.


What do indie publishers have that mainstream publishers don't?

A lot of flexibility and agility because you’re independent so you don’t answer to anybody but yourself which not the reality for big publishing companies with boards and lots of investors so that is the number one benefit.


Can you tell us a little bit about the new volume that has just launched?

So we released our new issue at the end of September. I’m sure you know we obviously we have a very big opening section on Rajasthan which we worked on with Kamalan so that’s our big travel focus. We also did a very big section on Southern California which includes Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Santa Barbara, San Diego and Ojai.

And we also did a section on the Faroe islands which is just an otherworldly landscape in a very different way from Rajasthan, very green and lush, and Rajasthan’s dry, arid heat. It was a nice mix of destinations actually, mostly non-urban which is a change of pace for us.

We also have what is probably the biggest style section in this title. We did interviews with artists like Lee Ufan. We interview brand founders of a brand that we love called Toast. We have an editorial on jewellery and lighting. So yeah, it’s a real varied issue and I am pleased with how it’s turned out.


I followed your trip here in India on Instagram and it felt quite design-centric with the hotels you chose. How did you decide where to stay?

We chose our hotels together with Kamalan. Working with Kamalan was fantastic because Dheeraj is the nicest guy and he really tries to understand what it is that you’re looking for. They have a set number of hotels that they work with, he gave us some suggestions and we chose what we felt was the most Cereal.

For example, I absolutely loved Raas in Jodhpur. I thought Mihir Garh just outside of Jodhpur was also equally lovely. The Imperial in New Delhi is a very classic property. We definitely stayed in properties that we felt were in line with our title. That’s something we always do, we also have to make hotel recommendations therefore the places that we stay have to reflect our brand most of the time.


What was the highlight of your trip to India?  

I just really remember the architecture actually. I was pretty blown away to see the intricacy of the buildings, and I was just saying to Rich the other day what I witnessed, which I understand is a very small percentage of what exists in Rajasthan, is that despite how intricate and ornate these palaces were, they didn’t feel garish. Everything just worked - the colour palate, the tile work.

I often find when I go to palaces in Europe It’s very grand but it’s a little bit OTT and it’s not to my taste. But it was the opposite in Rajasthan, these palaces were just incredible. I think the architectural scale is something I’ll always remember, and they’re always kind of overlooking the cities with these views and I will always have those images in my head I think.


What is a day like on the road like versus a day back at home?

When we’re travelling, it’s hard to say what our day looks like. It’s always different depending on why we’re there, what we’re doing. I suppose when we’re travelling it’s very early morning because our photographers like to wake up for sunrise and I don’t always wake up with them at five in the morning but I try to as much as I can.

We take a lot of meetings when we’re on the road because we’re meeting with various brands, and contacts for potential partnerships. On the road it’s literally that, we are out and about from very early in the morning to very late at night. It’s part of our job to understand the cities so we’re going to all the stores, all the museums and galleries and restaurants. It’s really full on, it’s exhausting so at the end of the trip we’re pretty wiped out but it’s worth it because that’s what we do. We have to understand the places that we cover so that we’re presenting the best information for our readers.

We live in Bath in the south west of England and work in Bristol. When we’re back at the office it’s a little bit more chilled out. We come into work, we catch up on emails, we spend time with our colleagues.

The dichotomy of being in the office and being on the road, it’s nice. It would be nice if we could be in the office more. That’s something for us to work towards next year.


What are your favourite places to recommend to people in Bath and Bristol?

My favourite bookstore is in Bath and it’s called Topping Booksellers, I love Topping because I think it kind of looks like a bookshop from the movies. So you walk in, and it’s just books everywhere, floor to ceiling, on the table, it smells like books, which I love.

They have tons of signed first editions, they have incredible author events, I actually just went to see Margaret Atwood this past Saturday through Topping so i think it’s such a blessing to have a bookshop like that in town. They’re open everyday 8am to 8pm. They serve you free tea and coffee while you browse so that’s definitely my spot.

I also really love getting breakfast or lunch at a small cafe called Sam’s Kitchen in Bath. I think the food they do is really lovely, very relaxed, really laid back vibe. That’s my go-to spot for food.

For coffee I love Colonna and Small’s, which is specialty coffee shop in Bath run by the former UK barista champion.

My favourite menswear store in Bristol is called Hoko. I think it’s actually my favourite menswear store in the UK. I just love their edit. I think that he carries the best brands, he carries Margaret Howell, Acne, Folk, Aesop. It’s really perfect, daily uniform kind of style.


Last question, what makes you most excited about your job?

I guess what’s most exciting is meeting people that I have admired for a really long time and thought I would never meet. But I get to meet them all the time to interview them for the magazine. I do get excited when those occasions arise.
 

 

Follow the event on facebook and RSVP to the launch of Cereal Volume 12 by emailing info@joinpaperplanes.com

Image: Jantar Mantar courtesy Cereal magazine.

We like Unravel

Where do discarded clothes go? 

In a small industrial town in Northern India, Panipat, hundreds of antiquated spinning mills recycle old, unwanted clothes from Western countries back into yarn. Unravel, a short film directed by Meghna Gupta in collaboration with Lucy Norris, an anthropologist who has worked extensively on used clothing markets in India, follows the clothes on a journey across India, revealing how Western consumption habits are seen on the other side of the globe. 

Reshma, a worker in one of these recycling mills, dreams of travelling to the countries the cast off clothes are from. While she and other women work, they construct an image of the West relying solely on imagination: "Maybe the water is too expensive to wash their clothes?..."

Stream the film for free on Aeon

Shift X Pavithra Dixit

LOVER played cupid in this collaboration between two of our favourite subscribers Pavithra Dixit (whose salads we featured in our first issue) and designer Nimish Shah of Shift for his Fall Winter 2016 collection. The result: A giant poster invitation to their runway show featuring a signature collage of that quintessential Indian birthday party mainstay: a paper plate of treats - Black Forest cake, samosas and wafers smudged with frosting.

To subscribe to LOVER, head over here. Your support helps us create an independent magazine we're proud of and subscribers get all the stories first, entry into our giveaways and lots of love from us. 

GIVEAWAY | The Happy Reader

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We're giving our happy readers two copies of The Happy Reader courtesy the lovely folks at Paper Planes, a brilliant service that offers some of the best international magazine titles to its subscribers each month. (Their online store is rad too.) 

"A quarterly magazine, [The Happy Reader is] a collaboration between Fantastic Man and Penguin Books. With Bookish Quarterly and seasonal magazine for readers for its strap lines, this magazine is a model book club in print.

Much like the book clubs, each issue of The Happy Reader  is an expedition through a select book, albeit only a classic. It doesn’t leaf through the pages of the book, but attempts to re-introduce you to those elements of the book that made it so special, in the most ingenious of ways."

We have the issues with Aziz Ansari and Grimes on the covers, and the Penguin classics Granite Island and Au Bonheur des Dames inspiring the themes and stories in the issue. A big shout out to LOVER subscriber Nupur at Paper Planes, we love you.

All those who subscribe on or before 26th August will go into the draw to win one copy. Our existing subscribers go into the draw to win the other. Click here to subscribe to LOVER.

Bombay Bicycle Club

Car hegemony is real and we lament often that our cities have been given over to motor vehicles, so when friend of LOVER Zuri Camille de Souza (who documented Pune's secret spaces in Issue Two) alerted us to a night cycling tour in Bombay, we loved the idea. 

It seemed to marry a few things we cared about - bicycle rides, public space, the ability to loiter after hours. Was it safe for women? We couldn't resist letting her take over our Instagram with a recap.

Click each image and roll over to read the captions.

Reality Tours and Travel's Midnight Bicycle Ride starts in Colaba and ends at Worli at sunrise. It costs Rs 1500 per head and includes breakfast. For more information, see here

 

Zuri Camille de Souza is a graphic designer and urban ecologist. Find her work online here and follow her on instagram @sensualecology